Rus Tourism News

Scandic to open in central Copenhagen

Scandic Hotels has signed an agreement with the landlord HM 2 A/S to operate the new large Scandic Spectrum hotel in central Copenhagen. The hotel, which will have 632 rooms, will be the largest in Scandic’s portfolio and is expected to open in 2021.

Scandic Spectrum – in direct proximity to the Central Station, Tivoli Gardens, City Hall and the harbor – will be an obvious hub for social gatherings and spending the night. The hotel will have 632 rooms and an entire floor devoted to restaurants, bars and a terrace. The terrace and windows on each floor will provide a great view of the city and the harbor.

– Copenhagen is an important region for us, and we have an exciting pipeline of hotels that will further strengthen our position in the market. Scandic Spectrum will be a landmark in Copenhagen, adapted for both business and leisure travelers. There is a high demand for hotels in Copenhagen and we’re extremely happy to have access to a big new hotel in such an attractive location, says Even Frydenberg, President & CEO Scandic Hotels Group.

– It is with great enthusiasm that we take on the task of building a modern, sustainable and environmentally friendly hotel in cooperation with Scandic. Scandic is an ideal partner for us, which, with its leading position in the Nordic region, provides us with a perfect starting point for creating a hotel with an identity that matches the Nordic region as well as Copenhagen, says Morten Bergesen of Hathon Holding AS and Havfonn AS, the two investment companies that together constitute HM 2 A / S.

Scandic is the largest hotel company in the Danish market and it has nine hotels in the Copenhagen region. In addition to the hotels already in operation, Scandic has an exciting pipeline of hotels in Copenhagen that includes Scandic Kødbyen, which will open in the Meatpacking district, and Scandic Falconer, which has well-appointed conference facilities, will re-open in Frederiksberg. Both hotels will open in 2018.

Demand in the Danish market, and in Copenhagen in particular, has increased steadily in recent years, driven mainly by international congresses and an increase in leisure travel.

Iuliia Tore